LI's Youth Leadership School is “the best you can do to be better involved”

February 24, 2011 | By Harald Brevik

As the nation celebrated the legacy of George Washington this past weekend, young men and women gathered in Lexington, Kentucky to prepare for leadership at LI’s Youth Leadership School (YLS).

For two full days students learned how to fight liberal bias effectively, energize youth groups, and promote campus activism. Judging the quality of the school, Amaris Wade said, “We learned how to campaign effectively for virtually any cause.” With lecture topics ranging from leadership identification to organizational building to media and public relations, the students listened attentively.

While students attending have tough fights on their respective campuses and in their respective communities, they set their aims high and vowed to utilize the material from the school to proceed on a path to success.

“I am looking forward to initiating a conservative youth movement in Bolivia,” said Carla Webber, also a intern with the Leadership Institute.. Ms. Webber continued by saying, that she also wants to “teach teenagers these skills so that they too can be encouraged to become effective and strong leaders for our nation.”

For decades, the Youth Leadership School has been the premier launch pad for thousands of youth wanting to make a lasting impact. The tools and techniques taught at the school prepare students for “what it means to be a youth leader,” Greg Caswell from the University of Kentucky said.

As the school finished, students rushed to share their newfound knowledge with their peers and take one step further on their chosen path. Ms. Webber concluded, “This training is absolutely essential for someone who is looking for a political career. Whoever has to deal with opposition and wants to win should take the YLS.

For information on upcoming trainings, please click here. For information specific to LI’s Youth Leadership Schools, please call 703-247-2000 to speak with Director of Youth Leadership Schools Kent Strang.