96 Young Conservatives Trained and Ready to Take back America

July 19, 2012 | By LI Staff

The Leadership institute recently hosted more than 90 students at the July Youth Leadership School. The Institute’s flagship training brought many young conservatives together from all over the U.S.

Dan Quiggle, a faculty member at the Leadership Institute (LI) and a business entrepreneur by trade, kicked the training off with the “The Real Nature of Politics” lecture, which confronts a popular misconception of conservative activists. 

“You’re not going to win just because your heart is pure,” Dan stated.  “The fact is that political technology determines political success.”

The lecture titled “Prepare for Leadership” was taught by Peggy Grande, a ten-year staff member to President Ronald Reagan during his post-presidency years.  During the lecture, she discussed developing a written plan, adhering to a timeline, initial organizational activities, youth campaign headquarters, and senior campaign relations were regarded in great depth. 

In her opening remarks Peggy gave some advice to the many aspiring politicos in the room.

“I didn’t come from a political family,” Peggy said.  “The way that I achieved my goals was by being constantly available and always arriving earlier and staying later than anyone else.  If you make that effort to stand out through excellence you will find success.”



Matt Kneece, LI’s director of the Youth Leadership School (YLS) department and a veteran of six campaigns, also delivered several lectures throughout the weekend.

Many students found his talk on building a conservative organization especially insightful.


 

Megan Lowe, a rising senior and founder of Young Women for America at Cedarville University in Ohio, said: “I learned so many new ways to get my message out – whether with balloon posters, flash flyers, or special projects.  These are methods that can be easily done on campus.”

LI YLS Intern Pamela Meyerhofer delivered her first lecture on how to effectively organize high schools for the conservative cause. 

“High schoolers are different than college students,” Pamela said.  “In order to be successful in utilizing them, you must understand the differences.”

In fact, one of the young high school attendees hopes to use her training to organize the youth vote at her at school.

Martha Crosby, a soon-to-be U.S. citizen and passionate conservative leader generously described her experience:

“After taking the YLS, I am devoted in becoming an exemplary leader for my university and as a U.S. citizen.  With the knowledge I have absorbed, I know I can get there.”